Right: Verondi Hinoki Cypress:  Dwarf

There are so many Hinoki Cypress available it will make your head spin.  I find that there is a lot of redundancy with this plant selection.  I tend to simplify the selection here at the shop.  Most forms are deep green in color. I have been a big fan of Verondi because it performs beautifully here in Massachusetts and is one of the hardiest gold forms.



Dwarf & Unusual Conifers for the Modern Garden
Written & Photographed by Marc Depoto of Hillside Nurseries
Tired of the same old evergreens?  When people think of evergreens often they conjure up images of yews and arborvitae devouring their front foundation, screening their windows and lacking any color!  The truth is there are many exciting conifers available today that will make you rethink their place in the modern landscape.

First, let’s define what a “conifer” is.  A conifer is any plant that is cone bearing. Some examples
of these are Pines, Spruce, and Fir. Conifers belong to an ancient plant group called the Gymnosperms. However, not all conifers are evergreens. Dawn Redwood, Bald Cypress, and Larch are examples of deciduous needle plants, and though rare, they drop their needles each
year with the onset of winter. Also, not all conifers are solely “needle bearing." Gingko trees,
Cycad palms, and the massive Kauri of New Zealand are conifers but look much different than
their “needled” counterparts.

The modern gardener will love the array of different forms, architecture, and color available with
the modern day conifers.  Many of these plants are low maintenance, drought tolerant, and slow growing. 

Professionals segregate them into four categories, in regards to growth rate.

Large:  Grows to 12” or more per year.
Intermediate:  Grows 6-12” per year.
Dwarf:  Grows 1-6” per year.
Miniature:  Grows 1” per year.
Right: Blue Shag White Pine. 

A dwarf form of our native White Pine, 'Blue Shag' is a bluish/green color and soft in appearance. It is a nice alternative to the typical Mugo Pine.
Left: Weeping White Spruce:  Intermediate growth

The weeping white spruce has a strong architectural presence and is perfect for tight spaces.  It develops a small skirt-- getting not much wider than 5’.

Right: Giant Sequoia: Large

The “King”! Giant Sequoia are the largest trees in the world.  (Not exactly new, but still rare in these parts.)  They grow fast and do well in protected locations here in Massachusetts.  Who knows, in 3-4,000 years you might have a monster in your yard!  Go see the largest of its kind east of the Mississippi River at the
Blithewold Mansions, Gardens and Arboretum in Bristol RI.
Left: Japanese White Pine:  Several forms with different growth rates.

At any one time we may have several varieties of Japanese White Pine at Hillside Nurseries.  Some look drastically different from each other.  Pictured is a classic form of the species-- bluish foliage with an open airy appearance. 'ogon Janome' and 'Goldilocks' Japanese 
White Pines have striking golden foliage and a more compact growth habit.

Right: Golden Spreader Fir:  Dwarf

This little one appreciates partially shaded
areas and helps to brighten them.

Left: Howells Dwarf Tigertail Spruce:  Dwarf/intermediate.

Bi-color foliage with reddish/purple cones to boot!

Right: Sherwood Compact Bristlecone Pine (left) and Mitsch Select Umbrella Pine (right):  Miniature and Dwarf

Both are the picture-perfect little evergreens with two different looks.  The Sherwood Bristlecone is dense and finetextured while the Mitsch Select Umbrella Pine appears exotic with its rubbery foliage. It almost seems tropical!

Above: Sherwood Compact Bristlecone Pine (left) and Mitsch Select Umbrella Pine (right):
Left: Angel Falls White Pine:  Large

There are several varieties of white pine on the market.  Some forms are weeping, rounded, prostrate and pyramidal.There is even a variety with re-curved/curly needles. Hillside Nurseries carries several forms. “Angel Falls” would compliment a waterfall feature. Notice the native stand of white pine in the upper right portion of the picture.
Any of these evergreens catch your attention? Call Marc at 508.528.0038 to discuss adding them into your landscape.
Left: Sesters Dwarf Blue Spruce

A dwarf form of blue Spruce. It has a strong conical growth habit but otherwise it is similar to 'Montgomery' above.
© Hillside Nurseries. All rights reserved. Site by Hort Marketers.
823 Washington Street | Franklin, MA 02038 | Phone 508-528-0038 | Contact Us. |
EVERGREENS
HILLSIDE NURSERIES

508.528.0038

Bellingham, MA
Montgomery Blue Spruce, Sesters Dwarf Blue Spruce, Blue Shag White Pine, Weeping White Spruce, Giant Sequoia, Japanese White Pine, Golden Spreader Fir, Howells Dwarf Tigertail Spruce, Sherwood Compact Bristlecone Pine. Mitsch Umbrella Pine, Sherwood Compact Bristlecone Pine, Angel Falls White Pine, Verondi Hinoki Cypress
Montgomery Blue Spruce, Sesters Dwarf Blue Spruce, Blue Shag White Pine, Weeping White Spruce, Giant Sequoia, Japanese White Pine, Golden Spreader Fir, Howells Dwarf Tigertail Spruce, Sherwood Compact Bristlecone Pine. Mitsch Umbrella Pine, Sherwood Compact Bristlecone Pine, Angel Falls White Pine, Verondi Hinoki Cypress
Montgomery Blue Spruce, Sesters Dwarf Blue Spruce, Blue Shag White Pine, Weeping White Spruce, Giant Sequoia, Japanese White Pine, Golden Spreader Fir, Howells Dwarf Tigertail Spruce, Sherwood Compact Bristlecone Pine. Mitsch Umbrella Pine, Sherwood Compact Bristlecone Pine, Angel Falls White Pine, Verondi Hinoki Cypress
Montgomery Blue Spruce:

A dwarf form of blue spruce.
Striking blue color 365 days a year!  Very drought tolerant and tough! 
Grows wider than it does tall.
The following are some exceptional conifers you will find at Hillside Nurseries!
Like us on Facebook
Remodeling and Home Design
Franklin Landscape Contractors
Garden Center Hours
Mon. - Fri. 8am.- 7pm.
Sat. 8am.- 6pm.
Sun. 9am-5pm.